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Posts by Nannette Rundle Carroll
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Nannette Rundle Carroll views management challenges as communication opportunities. For over 20 years, her powerful management seminars have helped participants use process skills to solve people problems. With this knowledge, managers can implement lasting solutions and build relationships. Her background as Director of Management Development/ Training for a Fortune 100 global division gives her a uniquely helpful perspective on aligning process, project and people management. Nannette is on the American Management Association Faculty. She is also a member of the National Speakers Association and is a certified Executive Presentation Skills expert.

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be yourself and your staff will be happy

Be Yourself: The Secret to Effective Leadership

By | Posted Oct 21, 2013 | 1 Comment

In the video below, Kristi Hedges points out a communication mistake that leaders tend to make:  They tend to think […]

jealousy at work

AMA Answers: How do I Deal With Jealousy at Work?

By | Posted Jul 10, 2013 | 1 Comment

I was recently promoted and a coworker really wanted my job. Not only didn’t she get it, she now reports […]

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AMA Answers: I Am a New Manager. How Do I Manage My Friends and Former Peers?

By | Posted Apr 2, 2013 | 1 Comment

Being responsible for the work of former peers and friends is a common concern that revisits any manager at any level who gets promoted from within. It is not solely a new manager concern. The good news is it does get easier with practice and experience. The three main areas to put your attention on are: enhancing your competency and confidence as a manager, establishing your credibility, and develop exceptional communication skills.

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Dig Deep Using the 3 Kinds of Open Questions

By | Posted Mar 22, 2013 | 1 Comment

Open questions are used to gather facts about the work, learn about your employees’ process skills and approaches to the tasks, discover what motivates and is important to them, and get a more well-rounded picture of events by listening to their sides of the story.